Anti Guitar Trio opened the gig.

Playing a set built around guitar interplay, the trio weaved in and out of each other with ease.
Their technical skill didn’t get in the way of their compositions. There was no room for showing off as the group used their abilities to continuously drive the songs forward. The music was complex, but it was appreciable as music.

Throughout their set Anti Guitar Trio’s songs oscillated in their intensity. There was nothing too far one way or the other, and all shifts came at the right times.

Anti Guitar Trio also employed a good use of dynamics. The sounds of the different guitars layered well and there was a nice application of both harmony and dissonance. Due to the use of cleaner guitar tones it was easy to perceive what was going on.

Overall Anti Guitar Trio provided a satisfying, enjoyable set.

Tangents were on next.
In contrast to Anti Guitar Trio’s set, Tangents’ primary focus was based around improvisation. Their songs had a slow build, would peak, then come back down.

Cello intermingled with keys, percussion and various other sound effects. Layers built upon layers, rising and falling, moving in and out of each other. The members moved forward, responding to the needs of each segment, seemingly letting the music dictate the direction.

There was clarity to the proceedings, and Tangents performed with a good deal of passion. It is difficult to say as to how enthusiastic the band was. However, this was music that didn’t demand outward displays of enthusiasm. It was music that wasn’t about being showy. It carried you along and took you to into itself.

The gig was good. Both groups performed well and neither short-changed the audience.

If you have the chance, go see either of these groups. Based off the performances they’re of different worlds, but  both groups are worth the time.